3D Voxel Demo

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Godot Engine
3D Voxel Demo

This demo is a minimal first-person voxel game, inspired by others such as Minecraft.Language: GDScriptRenderer: GLES 2How does it work?Each chunk is a StaticBody with each block having its own CollisionShape for collisions. The meshes are created using SurfaceTool which allows specifying vertices, triangles, and UV coordinates for constructing a mesh.The chunks and chunk data are stored in Dictionary objects. New chunks have their meshes drawn in separate Threads, but generating the collisions is done in the main thread, since Godot does not support changing physics objects in a separate thread. There are two terrain types, random blocks and flat grass. A more complex terrain generator is out-of-scope for this demo project.The player can place and break blocks using the RayCast node attached to the camera. It uses the collision information to figure out the block position and change the block data. You can switch the active block using the brackets or with the middle mouse button.There is a settings menu for render distance and toggling the fog. Settings are stored inside of an AutoLoad singleton called "Settings". This class will automatically save settings, and load them when the game opens, by using the File class.Sticking to GDScript and the built-in Godot tools, as this demo does, is quite limiting. If you are making your own voxel game, you should probably use Zylann's voxel module instead: https://github.com/Zylann/godot_voxel

Supported Engine Version
3.4
Version String
3.4-b0d4a7c
License Version
MIT
Support Level
official
Modified Date
1 year ago
Git URL
Issue URL

Voxel Game

This demo is a minimal first-person voxel game, inspired by others such as Minecraft.

Language: GDScript

Renderer: GLES 2

Check out this demo on the asset library: https://godotengine.org/asset-library/asset/676

How does it work?

Each chunk is a StaticBody with each block having its own CollisionShape for collisions. The meshes are created using SurfaceTool which allows specifying vertices, triangles, and UV coordinates for constructing a mesh.

The chunks and chunk data are stored in Dictionary objects. New chunks have their meshes drawn in separate Threads, but generating the collisions is done in the main thread, since Godot does not support changing physics objects in a separate thread. There are two terrain types, random blocks and flat grass. A more complex terrain generator is out-of-scope for this demo project.

The player can place and break blocks using the RayCast node attached to the camera. It uses the collision information to figure out the block position and change the block data. You can switch the active block using the brackets or with the middle mouse button.

There is a settings menu for render distance and toggling the fog. Settings are stored inside of an AutoLoad singleton called "Settings". This class will automatically save settings, and load them when the game opens, by using the File class.

Sticking to GDScript and the built-in Godot tools, as this demo does, is quite limiting. If you are making your own voxel game, you should probably use Zylann's voxel module instead: https://github.com/Zylann/godot_voxel

Screenshots

README Screenshot

README Screenshot

Licenses

Textures are from Minetest. Copyright © 2010-2018 Minetest contributors, CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported (Attribution-ShareAlike) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Font is "TinyUnicode" by DuffsDevice. Copyright © DuffsDevice, CC-BY (Attribution) http://www.pentacom.jp/pentacom/bitfontmaker2/gallery/?id=468

This demo is a minimal first-person voxel game, inspired by others such as Minecraft.

Language: GDScript

Renderer: GLES 2

How does it work?

Each chunk is a StaticBody with each block having its own CollisionShape for collisions. The meshes are created using SurfaceTool which allows specifying vertices, triangles, and UV coordinates for constructing a mesh.

The chunks and chunk data are stored in Dictionary objects. New chunks have their meshes drawn in separate Threads, but generating the collisions is done in the main thread, since Godot does not support changing physics objects in a separate thread. There are two terrain types, random blocks and flat grass. A more complex terrain generator is out-of-scope for this demo project.

The player can place and break blocks using the RayCast node attached to the camera. It uses the collision information to figure out the block position and change the block data. You can switch the active block using the brackets or with the middle mouse button.

There is a settings menu for render distance and toggling the fog. Settings are stored inside of an AutoLoad singleton called "Settings". This class will automatically save settings, and load them when the game opens, by using the File class.

Sticking to GDScript and the built-in Godot tools, as this demo does, is quite limiting. If you are making your own voxel game, you should probably use Zylann's voxel module instead: https://github.com/Zylann/godot_voxel

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Quick Information

0 ratings
3D Voxel Demo icon image
Godot Engine
3D Voxel Demo

This demo is a minimal first-person voxel game, inspired by others such as Minecraft.Language: GDScriptRenderer: GLES 2How does it work?Each chunk is a StaticBody with each block having its own CollisionShape for collisions. The meshes are created using SurfaceTool which allows specifying vertices, triangles, and UV coordinates for constructing a mesh.The chunks and chunk data are stored in Dictionary objects. New chunks have their meshes drawn in separate Threads, but generating the collisions is done in the main thread, since Godot does not support changing physics objects in a separate thread. There are two terrain types, random blocks and flat grass. A more complex terrain generator is out-of-scope for this demo project.The player can place and break blocks using the RayCast node attached to the camera. It uses the collision information to figure out the block position and change the block data. You can switch the active block using the brackets or with the middle mouse button.There is a settings menu for render distance and toggling the fog. Settings are stored inside of an AutoLoad singleton called "Settings". This class will automatically save settings, and load them when the game opens, by using the File class.Sticking to GDScript and the built-in Godot tools, as this demo does, is quite limiting. If you are making your own voxel game, you should probably use Zylann's voxel module instead: https://github.com/Zylann/godot_voxel

Supported Engine Version
3.4
Version String
3.4-b0d4a7c
License Version
MIT
Support Level
official
Modified Date
1 year ago
Git URL
Issue URL

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